New York soundtrack

Español

A month in New York seems like years in other places. When I wasn’t in the library I was getting in as much live music and dance as I could: swing, jazz and blues. I heard some fantastic artists, saw some great tapping and enjoyed the dances, but my personal favourite in Harlem was American Legion Post 398 (thanks to Greg Izor for the recommendation). This venue belongs to the American Legion (a veterans association) located on 248 W 132nd St in the heart of Harlem and has become the home of jazz thanks to organist Seleno Clarke, who started the Sunday jam tradition. Seleno passed away in December, but the spirit of jazz continues, and every Thursday and Sunday there is a jam session led by saxophonist David Lee Jones and other resident musicians, with the best local talent and musicians from all over the globe joining in. The atmosphere is very welcoming with an audience that combines veteran regulars and music-loving tourists. Russell, Barbara and Karen behind the bar, made me feel at home watching the Oscars gala with them during the band breaks.  The music is fantastic and on any given night you can find some well-known Harlem artists such as Anette St John, a singer who also performs at the Cotton Club and Smoke, among others. There is no cover charge (just a bucket collection for the band) and, a rare phenomenon in New York, –it’s possible to have a beer and a decent meal at a reasonable price. I cannot think of a better place to spend a Sunday evening and enjoy the jazz.

 

 

The Cotton Club, a mythical name for any jazz or swing fan, has inspired countless songs and films. Despite being a nightclub that only admitted white patrons and perpetuated a segregated society, performing there meant attaining the top in show business for African American artists of the twenties and thirties (among others Duke Ellington or Cab Calloway). The club was located initially on 142nd St with Lenox Avenue, later it moved downtown to 48th St and its latest incarnation is on 125th St. Those seeking the legendary Cotton Club of the twenties should be warned that the current venue somewhat lacks the glamour, although it keeps alive the musical and dance show tradition that made it famous. It was an unmissable  rendez-vous, so I headed there on a cold Monday in March. Attendance was low, mostly tourists, but the quality of the musicians and dancers was well worth the 25 dollar cover charge. An excellent big band was swinging with singer Anette St John. I loved the chorus girl numbers with their sparkly jazz dance and the incredible tap dancers. Some of the band numbers were danceable, but I wouldn’t recommend it as an event for Lindy hoppers unless you were going with a partner or a group. The night I went there were few social dancers, although I was lucky to dance several songs with Ice, a charming gentleman who is a regular at all the swing dance events I attended in New York (he told me he only takes Wednesdays off). Here I also met Shana Weaver: chorus girl, Lindy hop dancer and Ambassador for the Frankie Manning Foundation, she continues the Cotton Club chorus line tradition that gave rise to great stars like Josephine Baker or Lena Horne.

20180305_220907
Cotton Club dancers

Guitar prodigy King Solomon Hicks  stands out among the club’s performers. I was lucky to see him playing again at Terra Blues, a highly recommended venue on Bleecker St. The 22 year-old achieves a moving blues sound and he easily wins the audience over with his technical virtuosity and charm. The Harlem guitar player started by playing in local neighbourhood jam sessions, where he earned his stripes with high quality musicians. He was still a teenager when he participated in the Apollo Amateur Night and was promptly hired by the Cotton Club. Nowadays, when he is not playing in the city he can be seen on tour around the US and Europe (last year he was in Spain playing in venues like the Jamboree club in Barcelona or Café Central in Madrid, as well as other festivals).

20180314_233536
King Solomon Hicks playing Terra Blues

If you like your jazz with spectacular views the place is Jazz at Lincoln Center, a unique institution led by Wynton Marsalis, whose mission is to promote the enjoyment of jazz through performance and education “in the spirit of swing”. I have to love an organization that has a “Swing University”. Located at Columbus Circle (very close to Trump Tower, that’s New York for you), the venue’s window façade overlooking the city and Central Park alone is worth a visit. Jazz at Lincoln offers a high-quality varied music programme, ranging from its in-house orchestra led by Marsalis in person to the late night performances at Dizzy’s Coca Cola Club. Those who cannot attend live performances (either due to location or budget) can enjoy these concerts in live-streaming. In addition, Jazz at Lincoln provides an excellent education programme. I was very fortunate to attend a Listening Party about the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, an integrated all-woman big band of the 1930s and 1940s. Kit McClure’s orchestra, comprising ten women musicians, played versions from the repertoire of the International Sweethearts of Rhythm as well as showing some original footage. It was a double discovery: of the fascinating history of these pioneering women in swing, and of Kit McClure’s band, who offered a really swinging interpretation of great classics like “Jump Children”, “Vi Vigor” or “How About that Jive?”. More about New York: in a city where a coffee can cost five dollars I was able to enjoy the best swing music for free.

20180312_202240
Kit McClure’s orchestra at Jazz at Lincoln Center

Not all jazz plans need be nocturnal, and a musical Sunday can start with a delicious jazz breakfast at Smoke (in this case featuring a trio and vocalist). This well-known Upper West “jazz and supper club” offers quality music in an intimate and cozy setting. The brunch menu is not cheap, but a jazz fan has got to keep her strength up in a city like this.

20180311_120842
Performance at Smoke

Swing 46  is a classic of the New York swing scene (located on 46th St). With live music seven days a week, Swing 46 was a favourite spot among dance legends like Dawn Hampton (several photos honouring her decorate a corner table where she used to sit). Tuesdays is the night of the George Gee Swing Orchestra, a band that has been playing for dancers for over thirty years, and their swing did not disappoint. Given the quality of this band and the discount price for dancers of only 10 dollars, I was surprised at the small number of dancers in attendance: barely a handful of couples and some inexperienced tourists (the weather might have been a factor: I learned the meaning of a Nor’Eastern during my stay). Luckily tireless Ice was there, always smiling and ready to cut a rug, with whom I danced some fun numbers — although I found it hard to keep up with this swing veteran.

20180320_224011
Dancing at Swing 46

A note to Dancers: the most buzzing dance night I found was the Frim Fram, which takes place every Thursday at a dance school (Club 412 on 8th Avenue). There is no live music but it is a meeting point for dancers from all over New York (and beyond) of all ages and levels. The atmosphere is relaxed and I danced non-stop: in summary, a night to dance your feet off and meet other local Lindy hoppers.

There is very little of Swing Era Harlem still standing, which is why the Apollo Theater on 125th deserves a special mention.  With the Savoy and other major Harlem venues razed to the ground, the Apollo Theater is the only theatre that is still functioning, and very successfully, since 1934. That year Amateur Night at the Apollo started, the forerunner of the Got Talents and X-Factors of today, to which we owe the discovery of Ella Fitzgerald, Lauryn Hill or dancer Norma Miller, who also started her career winning a dance competition on this stage when she was only fourteen.

The list of stars who have performed at the Apollo is too long to detail, from James Brown to Michael Jackson, and a few years ago a “Walk of Fame” was installed on the sidewalk outside reflecting the premier place of this theatre in American culture. Many things have changed, but Amateur Night is still held every Wednesday (with a 10,000 dollar prize for the season winner). It is advertised as “The best fun you can have in this town for under $30”, and I can vouch this comedy and talent show makes good on its promise. Unlike other similar competitions, the audience not only chooses the winner by applause, but also has the power to boo-off performers: at which point a siren goes off and the famous “executioner” sweeps them off stage with his broom and dance. In this interactive show the audience is as much the protagonist as the contestants, of which there were all sorts: singers, dancers, rappers, poets…The Harlem crowd is not easy to please: if it does not like something it makes it known immediately and loudly.The night I attended they booed off the first three hopefuls as soon as they opened their mouths, which really makes me admire the bravery of the contestants who followed these acts on stage. Without question the best fun in Harlem.

20180328_214112
Apollo Theatre

My last week in New York I enjoyed dinner and a gig at Silvana’s Café, on 116th St in Harlem, thanks to my friend Loli Barbazán who now lives in the Big Apple. Less soaked in history, with a younger crowd and a friendly and multicultural vibe, Silvana’s brings together in its café cultural activities, good food and music. I was very pleasantly surprised by the different groups that played that night, anything from jazz to hip hop, and I especially fell in love with the tap dancers who went up to jam on-stage with the musicians. I wouldn’t mind going back.

20180327_205631
Jam at Silvana’s

I couldn’t leave without visiting Paris Blues, the well-known Harlem bar that was located round the corner from my apartment (also recommended by writer and occasional New Yorker Elvira Lindo). I wanted to spend my last hours soaking up all the neighbourhood music and charm that I could. The bar has been proudly run by Samuel Hargress, Jr. since 1968 and it remains true to its spirit: here you can find live jazz and blues every night until 3am for the price of a beer. The house band plays in a jam where other musicians join in, both young and old (a father with his teenage son for example). The warm atmosphere of this small bar encourages friendly conversation. There are few places like this left and it is worth enjoying them, even if it is just one for the road.

DSC00599
Paris Blues, Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. Live music every night.

I read today that: “After all New York is a fiction, a literary genre that adapts to the traveller’s state of mind.” (Manuel Vicent, El País,19 August 2018), although in this case I experienced the city as a song or an album that accompanied me throughout all my wanderings (and in New York you can wander a lot, walking, on the train…). I haven’t tired of the songs at any time and I hope to return soon, although I know that a city like New York cannot repeat itself, with its constant rhythm and improvisation it never plays the same tune twice.

I want to thank the Frankie Manning Foundation for having given me the opportunity to stay in New York in order to carry out my research on the history of Lindy hop (which I will talk about in another post).

 

BSO de Nueva York

English

Un mes en Nueva York parecen años en otros sitios. Cuando no estaba en la biblioteca me dedicaba a escuchar toda la música en directo que pudiera, además de bailar: swing, jazz y blues. Escuché algunos artistas increíbles, vi bastante claqué y disfruté de los bailes, pero sin duda mi local favorito fue el American Legion Post 398 (gracias por la recomendación Greg Izor). Este local de la Legión Americana (asociación de veteranos) se encuentra en 248 W 132nd St en pleno Harlem y se convirtió en el hogar del jazz gracias al organista Seleno Clarke, que empezó la tradición de las jams del domingo. Seleno se murió en diciembre, pero el espíritu del jazz continúa, y todos los jueves y domingos hay una jam dirigida por el saxofonista David Lee Jones y los otros músicos residentes, a los que se van sumando lo mejor del talento local y músicos de todas partes del planeta. El  ambiente es muy hogareño, con un público que combina los veteranos asiduos y turistas amantes de la música. Russell, Barbara y Karen detrás de la barra, me hicieron sentir como en casa viendo la gala de los Óscar con ellos en los descansos de la banda. La música es buenísima y en una noche cualquiera se pueden ver algunos artistas muy conocidos de Harlem como Anette St John, cantante que también actúa en el Cotton Club y Smoke, entre otros. No se paga entrada (solo la voluntad) y se da el rarísimo fenómeno de poder tomar una cerveza y buena comida a un precio razonable en Nueva York. No se me ocurre mejor sitio para pasar una tarde de domingo y dejarse llevar por el jazz.

 

 

 

El Cotton Club es un nombre mítico para cualquier aficionado al jazz y al swing que ha inspirado un sin número de canciones y películas. A pesar de que era un local que solo admitía un público blanco y perpetuaba una sociedad segregada, actuar allí suponía coronar la cima para cualquier artista afroamericano de los años veinte y treinta (entre otros Duke Ellington o Cab Calloway). El local se situaba inicialmente en la calle 142 con Lenox Avenue, luego se trasladó a la calle 48 en el distrito teatral y su última encarnación se encuentra en la calle 125. Para los que vayan buscando el legendario Cotton Club de los años veinte hay que advertir que el local actual carece de ese glamur, aunque mantiene vivo el formato de espectáculo musical y de baile que le dio renombre. Me pareció una cita ineludible así que acudí un frío lunes de marzo; el público era escaso y mayoritariamente turista, pero la calidad de los músicos y los bailarines bien valen los 25 dólares de la entrada. Tocaba una excelente big band con muchas tablas con la cantante Anette St John. Me encantaron los números de baile de las coristas, con su centelleante baile de jazz, y los números de claqué. Se podían bailar algunos números de la orquesta, pero no lo recomendaría como un evento para Lindy hoppers, a menos que se vaya con pareja o en grupo. La noche que fui había muy pocos bailarines sociales, aunque tuve la suerte de bailar varias con Ice — un señor encantador y asiduo a todos los eventos de baile swing a los que asistí en Nueva York (me dijo que solo descansaba los miércoles)–. Allí conocí también a Shana Weaver: corista, bailarina de Lindy hop y Embajadora de la Fundación Frankie Manning, continúa la tradición de las coristas del Cotton Club donde empezaron grandes estrellas como Josephine Baker o Lena Horne.

20180305_220907
Bailarinas del Cotton Club

De entre los artistas del Cotton Club destaca el prodigio de la guitarra King Solomon Hicks, al que tuve la oportunidad de ver otra vez tocando en Terra Blues, un local muy recomendable en Bleecker St. Con sólo 22 años consigue un sonido blues emocionante y su virtuosismo técnico y encanto atrapan al público sin dificultad. El guitarrista de Harlem empezó tocando en jams en los locales del barrio, curtiéndose con músicos de gran calidad. De adolescente participó en la competición del Amateur Night en el Teatro Apollo y lo ficharon enseguida en el Cotton Club. Ahora, cuando no está tocando en Nueva York se le puede ver de gira por EEUU y Europa (el año pasado estuvo en España tocando en locales como el Jamboree en Barcelona o el Café Central en Madrid además de varios festivales).

20180314_233536
King Solomon Hicks playing Terra Blues

 

Si te gusta el jazz con vistas espectaculares el lugar es Jazz at Lincoln Center, una institución única liderada por Wynton Marsalis, cuya misión es promover el disfrute del jazz y la educación siguiendo “el espíritu del swing”. Una organización que tiene una “Universidad de Swing” ya me tiene ganada. Situado en Columbus Circle (muy cerca de la Trump Tower, cosas de Nueva York) el local, abierto al público, dispone de un gran ventanal con vistas de la ciudad y Central Park. Ofrece un programa variadísimo de actuaciones de la más alta calidad, desde su orquesta propia dirigida en persona por Marsalis a las actuaciones nocturnas en Dizzy’s Coca Cola Club. Los que no puedan asistir a las actuaciones en directo (por razones de bolsillo o por ubicación) también pueden disfrutar de ellos en live streaming. Además, ofrece un excelente programa educativo. Tuve la inmensa suerte de poder asistir a un concierto didáctico sobre el swing en femenino: la orquesta de Kit McClure, compuesta por diez mujeres, tocaron versiones del repertorio de las International Sweethearts of Rhythm, una “girl band” de los años treinta y cuarenta. Fue un doble descubrimiento de las pioneras del swing y su fascinante historia, y de la orquesta de Kit McClure, que ofreció una interpretación realmente swingueante de grandes temas como “Jump Children”, “Vi Vigor” o “How About that Jive?”. Más cosas de Nueva York: en una ciudad donde un café con leche te cuesta cinco dólares (más propina), pude disfrutar de la mejor música swing gratis.

20180312_202240
Kit McClure’s orchestra at Jazz at Lincoln Center

No todos los planes de jazz son nocturnos, y un domingo musical puede empezar con un delicioso desayuno a ritmo de jazz (en este caso un trío con vocalista) en Smoke. Este conocido “jazz and supper club” del Upper West ofrece buena música en un ambiente íntimo y confortable. El menú de desayuno (o “brunch” ) no es barato, pero una aficionada tiene que coger fuerzas en una ciudad como ésta.

20180311_120842
Performance at Smoke

Swing 46 es un clásico de la escena swing de Nueva York (en la calle 46). Con música en directo siete días a la semana, Swing 46 era uno de los locales de referencia donde acudían leyendas del baile como Dawn Hampton (la mesita en la que se solía sentar tiene varias fotos dedicadas a su memoria). Los martes toca la George Gee Swing Orchestra, con más de tres décadas de historia tocando para bailarines y un sonido que no defraudó. Tratándose de una big band de esta calidad, y con un precio descontado para bailarines de solo 10 dólares, me sorprendió el pequeño número de bailarines que había: apenas un par de parejas y algunos turistas inexpertos (el mal tiempo pudo ser un factor: aprendí lo que significa una tormenta de nieve en Nueva York durante mi estancia). Menos mal que estaba el incansable Ice siempre sonriente y dispuesto a quemar la pista, con el que bailé varios temas muy divertidos aunque me costara seguirle el ritmo a este veterano del swing.

20180320_224011
Dancing at Swing 46

Un apunte para bailarines: la noche de baile social que encontré más animada fue el Frim Fram, que tiene lugar todos los jueves en una academia de baile (Club 412 en la Octava Avenida). No hay música en directo pero es un punto de encuentro para bailarines de todo Nueva York (y más allá) de todas las edades y niveles. El ambiente me pareció muy relajado y bailé sin parar: en resumen una noche para sudar la camiseta y conocer los lindy hoppers del lugar.

Queda muy poco en pie del Harlem de la era del swing, por eso el Teatro Apollo en la calle 125 se merece una mención especial. Desaparecidos el Savoy y otros locales de entretenimiento, el Teatro Apollo es el único teatro que sigue funcionando, y con gran éxito, desde 1934. En ese año empezó a celebrarse el concurso Amateur Night en el Apollo, precursora de los Got Talent y Factor X de nuestros días, y gracias a la cual fue descubierta Ella Fitzgerald, Lauryn Hill, o la bailarina Norma Miller, que también empezó su carrera ganando una competición de baile sobre este escenario con solo 14 años. La lista de estrellas que ha actuado en el Apollo es demasiado larga para detallarla, desde James Brown a Michael Jackson, como se refleja en el paseo de estrellas de la acera que confirma el lugar destacado de este teatro en la cultura americana.  Han cambiado muchas cosas, pero el Amateur Night sigue celebrándose cada miércoles (con un premio de 10,000 dólares al ganador de la temporada). Se anuncia como: “El máximo de diversión que puedes conseguir en Nueva York por menos de treinta dólares”, y doy fe de que cumple con su promesa en un espectáculo completo de humor y talento. A diferencia de otros concursos del estilo, el público no solo elige el número ganador con sus aplausos, sino que también tiene el poder de echar a los concursantes con sus abucheos: en ese momento suena una sirena y sale el famoso “verdugo” para echarlos del escenario con su escoba y un baile. En este espectáculo interactivo el público es tan protagonista como los concursantes, de los que hubo de todo tipo: cantantes, bailarines, raperos, poetas…y el público de Harlem no es fácil de contentar: si no le gusta lo hace saber inmediatamente y a voz en cuello. La noche que fui abuchearon a los tres primeros concursantes nada más abrir la boca, por lo que tengo que admirar el valor de los concursantes que salían a continuación. Sin duda lo más divertido de Harlem.

20180328_214112
Apollo Theatre

Mi última semana en Nueva York disfruté de una cena y concierto en Silvana’s Café, en la calle 116 en Harlem, gracias a mi amiga Loli Barbazán que ahora vive allí. Un local con menos historia pero con un ambiente muy multicultural y acogedor, de público mayoritariamente joven, combina el café con las actividades culturales, la buena comida y la música. Me sorprendieron muy gratamente los diferentes grupos que tocaron desde el jazz al hip hop y sobre todo me enamoraron los bailarines de claqué que salieron a hacer jam con los músicos. Un lugar para repetir.

20180327_205631
Jam at Silvana’s

No podía irme sin visitar el Paris Blues, el conocido bar de Harlem que estaba a la vuelta de la esquina de mi casa y además venía recomendado por la escritora Elvira Lindo, conocedora de la ciudad. Quise agotar las últimas horas empapándome de toda la música y todo el encanto del barrio que pudiese. El local lo lleva Samuel Hargress, Jr. con mucho orgullo desde 1968 y se mantiene fiel a su espíritu: allí se puede encontrar jazz y blues en directo todas las noches hasta las tres de la mañana por el precio de una birra. La banda de la casa toca en una jam a la que se van sumando diferentes músicos veteranos y jóvenes (un padre con su hijo adolescente por ejemplo). Es un local pequeño que invita a la cercanía y la conversación. Quedan pocos sitios así y merece la pena disfrutarlos, aunque sea para tomar la penúltima.

DSC00599
Paris Blues, Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. Live music every night.

He leído hoy que: “Después de todo Nueva York es una ficción, un género literario que se adapta a cualquier estado de ánimo del viajero” (Manuel Vicent, El País, 19-08-2018), aunque en este caso la he vivido como una canción o un álbum que me ha acompañado en todos mis recorridos (y en Nueva York se hace mucho recorrido, en metro, a pie…). No me he cansado de los temas en ningún momento y espero volver pronto, aunque sepa que una ciudad como ésta no puede repetirse, con su ritmo y su improvisación constante sonará siempre diferente.

Quiero agradecer a la Fundación Frankie Manning el haberme dado la oportunidad de la estancia en Nueva York para realizar mi trabajo de investigación sobre la historia del Lindy hop (de eso hablaré en otro post).

Ella es jazz

Hoy, martes 25 de abril de 2017 se cumplen cien años del nacimiento de Ella Fitzgerald. Es un año de muchos centenarios: ese mismo año se editó el primer disco de jazz, de la Original Dixieland Jazz Band. No se puede entender el swing, el jazz y la música norteamericana sin Ella. Según la biografía conocida, que se puede leer en la wikipedia y otros, nació el 25 de abril de 2017 en Newport News, creció en la pobreza de la Depresión y se trasladó a Harlem en Nueva York a los quince años cuando perdió a su madre, en 1932.

Poco después la descubrió Chick Webb, que lideraba la orquesta del Savoy Ballroom, cuando ganó un concurso de talentos amateur cantando en el famoso Teatro Apolo. Chick la llevó al Savoy y la convirtió en la cantante de su banda con solo 17 años, lo demás es historia. Su colaboración fue fructífera: el swing nació en Harlem, en el Savoy concretamente, de la mano de Ella y Chick, conocido también como el “Rey del Swing”.  Nos han dejado grandes temas bailables de esta época, pero su verdadero estrellato comenzó con el éxito A Tisket, A Tasket en 1938. Cuando Chick murió prematuramente en 1939 por sus problemas de salud,  Ella pasó a liderar la orquesta de Chick Webb durante algunos años más.

Lo que quizá no sea tan conocido es que Ella Fitzgerald también bailaba Lindy, y que antes que cantante había querido ser bailarina. Demuestra la afinidad que existía entre los músicos y bailarines, que se inspiraban mutuamente.  Llegó a decir más tarde: “Nunca me consideré una cantante. Lo que yo en verdad quería era bailar” (Tales of the Swing Age). Noche tras noche, Ella cantaba en el Savoy, y lo jóvenes lindy hoppers, Frankie Manning y Norma Miller entre otros, acudían a bailar. La sintonía entre músicos y bailarines era absoluta. En sus primeros años fueron incluso compañeros de gira.

Ella no solo creó el swing, siguió evolucionando como cantante de jazz a lo largo de su carrera que abarca todas las épocas y músicos de jazz del siglo XX, del swing al bop y el cancionero de Cole Porter. Es por ejemplo una de las grandes cantantes de “scat” junto con Louis Armstrong: la voz como instrumento musical de jazz, la voz como emoción y libertad, todo en uno, sin palabras. Incluso en los temas más melancólicos escuchar a Ella nunca produce desesperanza, siempre se vislumbra el optimismo de su vitalidad. Siempre, siempre, tiene swing.

Y por poder seguir disfrutando y bailando sus temas, gracias Ella.

Me disculpo por la brevedad porque van a dar las doce y no quería dejar pasar esta fecha. Lo mejor es escucharla: afrontemos la música y bailemos.

Undecided, Ella and the Chick Webb Orchestra

Blue Skies, Ella Fitzgerald

100 Songs for a Centennial, Spotify 

bardu

Ella Fitzgerald Foundation